All posts filed under: Video Games

How To Win At Forge of Empires

The following is the lesson I learned while navigating the fun and very addicting simulation game Forge of Empires. Are you Ready! Follow what you’re told to do! Honestly, it’s that simple. The objective of the game is to progress through your empire, travelling the various western civilized cultures and acquiring new knowledge along the way. And while there are side quests, guilds to join, and the occasional trade to be made, the honest to god truth is just do what you’re told. Need to research a new production building? Research it! Oh, what’s that you say… you don’t have enough forge points? Here’s the second lesson…   Patience The hook of the game is the need for diamonds, which is a red herring. So far, I’ve navigated to the Early Middle Ages without spending a penny on this game… How you might ask? Wait! That’s it. Just wait for more research points. Every day, without clicking a single mouse button, you can earn 10 forge points for just having a kingdom. No bullshit, no hidden …

happy wheels (video game)

I’m a bit baffled by the popularity of this game. My nephews like it. Kids like it. People like it. And I hate it. There’s just no way to state it any other than this is a gimmick. There’s no real winners. No real challenge. Just launch a sprite across a level and watch him get manhandled by spikes, canons, and other objects. It’s pure nihilism; a Lynchian version of Jackass; an eternal loop of destruction that brings shrieks of delight from the young ones. As an uncle I try to not to be that guy who says “This is too mature for the kids” but I definitely start to get that vibe from this game. It’s pure bloodthirst. Imagine if Grand Theft Auto verged on just killing random strangers mode and you start to get the sense of the true anarchy that this game elicits. But even Rockstar’s megahit franchise has some sense of logos in how you must defend your career as a budding criminal. And this game makes the destruction of those …

Why It’s Important to Consider Atari’s E.T. a Work of Art

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (Video Game, 1982) Developer: Atari, Inc. Designer: Howard Scott Warshaw The question of whether video games should be considered art has always baffled me. Video games are compromised of visuals, music and sound, and narratives. Throw is the aspect of gameplay, an equally form of art a well (more on this later), and you have a composite form that evokes mood, sensation, and meaning. Isn’t this what art aims for? And yet, we still can’t come to a consensus. Art means many different things to many different people, and often this argument boils down to definitions, but I think we would agree that at its essence, art sparks a reaction, whether that be a painting or photograph, realistic or abstract. I’d argue anything can be considered art, depending on how you experience and interpret the artifact. Some may disagree. For example, many critics I respect and admire have made the claim that video games are in fact not art, among which include the late Roger Ebert and loveable green guy Film Crit …