All posts filed under: Television

Nooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!

Well this is fucking bullshit. My favorite television show, that I never got to fucking see, got cancelled after just one season (not really, it just lost it’s host, but you get the drift). That’s right bitches, I’m talking about Celebrity Apprentice, a show so funny that you’ll spill your milk of laughter has lost the one and only main man Arnold Schwarzenegger, which is complete BS! Apparently the reason of his departure is do to fucking Donald Trump killing its ratings, but I think that’s just a red herring. The truth is that Arnold probably has more integrity than to waste his time on such bullshit. And honestly, that’s how I feel too! Arnold needs to hit the gym and do what he does best, which is pump some damn iron. And dammit, we need a sequel to that documentary too! So you Arnold, don’t quit the limelight yet! The camera still needs you, and those glorious biceps too!   Source: Arnold Schwarzenegger Quits <i>Celebrity Apprentice</i>, Blames Anti-Trump Boycott Advertisements

I finally finished it!!!!!!

    Yes its true, I finally finished the albatross hanging around my neck that is Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Everyone bitches that the last season (no. 7) is the worst but my god that is honestly my favorite season.   It’s kooky, sincere, lovely, banal, and above all else all out entertaining.   The beauty of the show is how Spike feels pain at the end, and realizes that that is his real soul. Yes, the red herring of the season was that Spike found his soul, when the reality was he didn’t find it until he had to sacrifice himself for someone he loved. It struck me like a lightning bolt seeing him feel that pain and joy at the same time…there’s something beautiful about experiencing everything life has to offer all at the same moment…probably like childbirth or something.   And damn did Buffy look beautiful when she told Spike she loved him. Sarah Michelle Gellar gave one hell of a performance in that moment, all expressed in her eyes and facial features. …

I’m almost finished with Buffy

Ah, so after a 2 month hiatus I’m finally inching towards the finale of my love/hate TV show Buffy the Vampire Slayer, home to my teenager dreams that were squashed by my penis and skinny 16 year old blonde girl. Don’t ask. Kinda sums up my feelings right now. Buffy the Vampire Slayer 7.21 The beauty of this season is how smatlzy it’s all become. The drama’s been turned up to 11, the humor more meta and kooky, and finally the writers (possibly the women on the team, see the writer of 7.20) seem to have shaken loose from the fucking emoness of season 6. Not that it was bad, but just damn depressing. Buffy seems to have gotten over her breakup with Riley while making amends with her fondness for the ever badboy Spike by shairing a bed with him without sharing a bed with him if you catch my drift. And now in this episode she has found her hero’s journey (ala a meta in-joke and parallel to King Arthur’s quest for the sword …

Buffy the Vampire Slayer 7.4

[exhales a satisfied sigh] Ah, another strong episode of good ol’ Buffy. Maybe it’s been the time I’ve taken off from the show (I finished season 6 back in March of last year) but this season has been really rich thematically. I’ve kinda warmed up to the idea of Buffy the Responsible Adult and the sadness of realization that there might not be happy ending for any of the characters on the show. However, the difference between last season and this one is that instead of feeling emo and dour, this season seems to really strike a resonant chord with me. I have a slight inkling that perhaps a big push for my fondness so far is that the show hasn’t focused on the big bad yet or settled into a true monster of the week schtick. Instead, it keeps exploring the aftermath of Season 5’s major plot point (the death of Buffy’s mom) and Buffy accepting adulthood. The episode starts with a nice opener of Buffy settling into her new gig as guidance counselor …

Buffy the Vampire Slayer 7.3

3 episodes in and it’s already apparent that I’m enjoying Buffy’s final season infinitely more than season 6 and it’s dour and sadness. Last season was a drag with everyone depressed and Buffy constantly moping around, to the point where I felt it unbearable. This season opened with a surprisingly light and fun opener, penned by show creator Joss Whedon, that felt like an apology of sorts for last seasons emo tone. I’ve read, thankfully without being subjugated to spoilers, that this season has some rough spots and is quite awful, but honestly I’m pretty hooked on the story. Spike is back in town and seems to have lost something mentally, a frustrating development and yet suggesting that his character is going through some cathartic changes. I’ve always had a soft spot for Spike. Once he had the chipped placed in his head that prevented him from attacking good beings, I started rooting for his character. Unfortunately the writers deemed it necessary to keep him an asshole, to the point where he attempts to rape …

Tackling the Morality of Violence in Netflix’s Daredevil

So about a month ago I wrote a review about the pilot episode of Netflix’s original series Daredevil. In that review I praised the episode for taking on a more realistic and serious tone compared with Marvel’s studio films. I was thrilled that this wasn’t another CGI fest with absurd fights and 9/11 porn. I still stand by this assessment. But a funny thing happened as I watched the rest of the series. I started wishing that the series was more comicky and absurd. But even more important, I started with his Daredevil was more heroic and less thuggish. To be clear, I’m not hating on the show. I liked that it was more crime based and less about the superhero. But what kept nagging me was just how violent the whole thing was, and more importantly, how that violence was portrayed. Violence isn’t anything new cinematically. Westerns had their shootouts, Dirty Harry had his Smith & Wesson revolver, superheroes have their super powers. I have no qualms with the very idea of violence in films, …

Mad Men 7.14 (TV, 2015)

Who would have guessed that all Don Draper needed was a hug? In a somewhat surprising traditional finale, Matthew Weiner and Co. gave a sense of finality with our flawed but cherishes characters, almost all with seemingly happy endings. That’s what I mean when I say the finale was surprising. It gave so much closure to a show that has refused to bend to traditional narratives. And yet it felt earned, at some points perhaps handled a little sloppily, but earned nonetheless. And it ended with one of the most famous ads ever aired. Every major character had a moment to shine on the episode. We saw Roger and Megan’s mother speaking French to each other at a posh restaurant. Peggy and Stan finally confessed their love to each other. Pete and Trudy headed off smiling as they boarded a private jet. Joan started up her own production company. Even Don got some much needed therapy, and sent the show off with a sly smile. Ever the survivor, that one. The only real character that …